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Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus writes in his de Thematibus that before the army terminology had shifted from Latin to Greek, they used to call the chiliarch "longinus". and the general "comes". Has anyone ever seen the word "longinus" be used in such a way, denoting some kind of military office?
Quick question, in the Greek alphabet that would be spelled "Χιλιαρκος" right?

On another note, having read a number of Late Antique texts, I have never seen the term Longinus used in that way.

Did not Porphyrogenitos assemble the same collection Priscus assembled? Could he have seen it in a text now lost to us?

Could it possibly some sort of confused corruption of Limitis (As in Dux Limitis)? Or possibly a corruption of Legatus Legionis?
It would be spelled χιλίαρχος. Treat all "ch" in Greek transliterated words as h in hill and hell.

I expect this statement to be an error of some sort, I also have never encountered it or anything like it in any Greek text but I thought I'd ask before jumping to any conclusions.
But Longinus also occurs as a personal name, right?
I think it's a corruption of Legatus or Legionis. They sound quite similar to Longinus.
Yes, it is a name that crops up quite often. I tend to agree with you Evan that he may mean legatus.
Longinius was allegedly the Centurion at Jesus' Crucifixion, according to the Catholic Church.
And we are not sure if that Centurion really named Longinus or if this was just a description of his role at crucifiction because he allegedaly speared Jesus and Longinus means a spearmen...hovewer Romans indeed use name Longinus so it might be only a coincidence.

I also think theory by Evan might be right.
Does Longinus mean "spearman"? I know it has to do with "long" but does it also mean spearman or some form of bodyguard (like the Greek term doryphoroi)?

This could be interesting as the way I see it, the emperor seems to be talking about late Roman times and it seems that during Justinian's times the term spearman-doryphoros was used for a general's confidents who were acting as both bodyguards and occasional generals and commanding officers.
Eh the name literally means "long" with a derivative suffix often uses for cognomen. It's unlikely to occur as a corruption of any of those suggestions since they're so phonologically dissimilar. The solution will have to lie in usage. No one, I don't think, has cited the passage and I haven't read de. Them, for ages (and then only poorly) so someone will have to investigate what he means to imply by using that. Most likely it's just a mistake, they're very common.

The only other option I can think of would be textual, but I've not seen the original manuscript and I doubt such a scribal error can occur.

The way to take it might just be to say that they're using longinus - doryphoros for whatever unrecoverable reason.
Quote:But Longinus also occurs as a personal name, right?

Yes, for instance in Josephus, B.J. 2.544 (Λογγῖνος δὲ χιλίαρχος; Longinus the tribune) and 5.312 (Λογγῖνός τις τῶν ἱππέων; Longinus, one of the equestrian order).
Quote:
Robert Vermaat post=355580 Wrote:But Longinus also occurs as a personal name, right?

Yes, for instance in Josephus, B.J. 2.544 (Λογγῖνος δὲ χιλίαρχος; Longinus the tribune) and 5.312 (Λογγῖνός τις τῶν ἱππέων; Longinus, one of the equestrian order).
And, of course, Longinus Sdapeze in Colchester:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/thearmatur...410967011/