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Full Version: Lost Ring Comes Back. AGAIN!
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I first lost my ring about 5 years ago. It came back, but the story is a long one.
Then I lost it again 2 years ago while visiting a friend in Pennsylvania. A week ago he found it in a box that neither he or I remember rummaging through. I don't know what kind of karma follows this ring, but I consider it lucky. It's over 1,500 years old and originally belonged to a Roman soldier. The symbol causes mixed reactions, but it was used by a greeting card company, it's the name of a town in the U.S., and it was the logo of the Canadian Candy Company. Today, it's featured on Japanese road maps... denoting a Buddhist temple.

[attachment=7791]swastikaring029.JPG[/attachment]
Congratulations on getting it back again.


Quote:It's over 1,500 years old and originally belonged to a Roman soldier.

Wow. If I had a ring like that, I would be afraid to touch it often, much less wear it!
Well found indeed and the symbol is a very ancient one however in Medieval times it was known as a Gammadion, four letters GAMMA joined at the centre which indicates the four Saints Mathew, Mark, Luke, and John,
The symbol is very similar to this one on a Medieval ring I found some years ago that I gave to the owner of the land where I found it.
It's a ring intended to be used for a seal.

It's why it looks ominous, for the Nazi party used a reversed-swastika, rather than the classic arcane and mystical symbol seen all over the place. Why they should do that I have never known.

But certainly, once impressed, it would form the more normal 'proper' symbol, rather than the reversed one that has become so reviled after the usage last century.

On a note of principle; I would suggest that the image be caveated with no intent to offend, for unless I am mistaken, it is still a banned image in Germany and such an image could be considered to be trying to get round that restriction. A new picture showing it with a mirror (so a double image) of even having impressed some wax would be interesting.
Thanks to all,

To Mark,

The ring has the symbol facing correctly as found in the ancient Roman context, including soldier tunics and villa floor mosaics. It's not an intaglio wax-sealing ring, but rather made from a bronze coin. The symbol may represent a chariot wheel rolling from east to west, but maybe not. I wear it all the time and I deal with the public. The other day, a lady said, "Tell me about your ring." I gave her its history, and she answered that it was also an American Indian symbol.

It's a shame that-- even here on RAT with its knowledgeable membership-- this auspicious symbol cannot be mentioned by its original Sanskrit name. Cry
Amazing.
Quote: It's a shame that-- even here on RAT with its knowledgeable membership-- this auspicious symbol cannot be mentioned by its original Sanskrit name. Cry
I don't think there is any problem calling this a swastika symbol here on RAT, especially as it is clear from the context that it's a Roman object without any modern political attachments. We have had a good debate about the swastika on gear 5 years ago, and an even longer one 6 years ago, so I think this topic is well-coverd.

Quote:I don't know what kind of karma follows this ring, but I consider it lucky. It's over 1,500 years old and originally belonged to a Roman soldier
And before the Roman soldier it was owned by a strange create that found it in a river and subsequently hid in the Misty Mountains. I think he called it 'precioussss'.
The Ring chooses its owner, you know... that's why you can't loose it. Better watch out for strange black hooded riders near your home. They're NOT Sarmatinas. :evil:
I was simply taken aback when informed by another poster that the symbol is outlawed in Germany. Nor was the symbol mentioned by name in any of the posts above, giving me the impression that I had stepped into a cultural swamp. As for "karma," the ring has been returned to me twice, first by a former employer and again through the mail.

Enough said. 8+)
Quote: I was simply taken aback when informed by another poster that the symbol is outlawed in Germany. Nor was the symbol mentioned by name in any of the posts above, giving me the impression that I had stepped into a cultural swamp.
Nah. The symbol is not banned, only the symbol in connection with (neo)nazism. No problem publishing articles about the swastika as a cultural decorative item in 1200 BC Pylos or something.

Quote:As for "karma," the ring has been returned to me twice, first by a former employer and again through the mail.
Enough said. 8+)
Yeah yeah. We all know the mail works for he-who-should-not-be-named. Smile
Quote:Yeah yeah. We all know the mail works for he-who-should-not-be-named. Smile

Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. :grin:
Two years ago, I bought an ultra-rare antique fishing rod. The USPS broke the rod, the original wooden case, the bag, and the mailing tube. I think he-who-should-not-be-named used the rod for a crowbar. :whistle:
I went to Nepal a couple of years ago and took a few photos of the swastika in some incongruous places, one was on a packing box for 'Swastika Cooking Oil', another was a pair of giant swastikas on hotel gates (I think the hotel or building was used for funeral parties).
Quote:
Alanus post=343052 Wrote:I was simply taken aback when informed by another poster that the symbol is outlawed in Germany. Nor was the symbol mentioned by name in any of the posts above, giving me the impression that I had stepped into a cultural swamp.
Nah. The symbol is not banned, only the symbol in connection with (neo)nazism. No problem publishing articles about the swastika as a cultural decorative item in 1200 BC Pylos or something. ...............

I apologise if I was wrong - I genuinely was concerned over the potential fall-out - but now perhaps my understanding can be changed..... :unsure:

1 - I was fairly sure that the symbol was banned (it certainly used to be) - and hence why even things like Airfix kits years ago had to have a separate box-art and transfer/decal set done for them. When I last served in Germany, I was sure that was still the case, but perhaps it's changed in the last 20yrs.

2 - Secondly that the original astrological 'swastika' (I simply cannot recall the proper name) was indeed a right-hand/clock-wise one (all sorts of pictures and mosaics, etc) and that the 'reverse-swastika' or 'hacken kreuz' (sp)/'broken cross' was used 80 odd years ago for some reason.

If either or both are not true, then I'd be most curious...... Smile
Quote:2 - Secondly that the original astrological 'swastika' (I simply cannot recall the proper name) was indeed a right-hand/clock-wise one (all sorts of pictures and mosaics, etc) and that the 'reverse-swastika' or 'hacken kreuz' (sp)/'broken cross' was used 80 odd years ago for some reason.

Hello, Mark

You will find, without much searching, that both versions of the swastika originated in extreme antiquity. My ring is dated between AD 100 and 300. My Buddha statue (with the reverse on its chest) is from the Quing Dynasty, the 1600s to 1911, but other statues date back to the Tang Dynasty, c. AD 700. The Amer-Indian version goes back before Europeans reached the New World. The Finnish Air Force still uses the symbol. Confusedmile:
Alan.
The ring I have shown is Medieval and that has the same configuration as yours there is other lettering on mine that is Gaellic which I wanted to show but did not want to go so far off topic, it is rather strange but no one has found any religious explanation of it as yet.