RomanArmyTalk

Full Version: The Altar at Adamklissi
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Does anyone have a good photo of the altar at Adamklissi - the one that is said to have had the names of as many as 3,800 Roman soldiers on it? I have some information about it, including a sampling of the 52 names which have survived.
I am interested in a good clear photo of what is left of the altar at the site and perhaps - would be very welcome - a picture of at least one of the surviving fragments with names on it.

Thanks,
There's a collection of pictures of the inscription fragments here:

Ubi Erat Lupa

As you can see, it's in a bit of a mess!

[Image: 15396-1.jpg]
Quote:Does anyone have a good photo of the altar at Adamklissi ... I am interested in a good clear photo of what is left of the altar at the site and perhaps - would be very welcome - a picture of at least one of the surviving fragments with names on it.
I don't know if there's much left on the ground. The fragments of the inscription are in Constanta museum. (Lists of Roman names are never easy to photograph successfully!) In case you haven't seen it, here's the original publication in Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum Vol. III Suppl. 2 (1902), when it was believed that the missing emperor's name must be Trajan. Most scholars nowadays incline towards Domitian.
[attachment=7382]CIL_III_14214.jpg[/attachment]

Edit: Judging by Nathan's photo (above), maybe whoever laid out the stones in the museum should've had a look in CIL to see which bit goes where! :whistle:
Thank-you very, very much, Nathan and Duncan! Smile Just what I needed. The scholar I am most familiar with also leans toward Trajan - Valerie Hope in her paper, "Trophies and Tombstones: Commemorating the Roman Soldier" from World Archaeology, Vol 35, No 1, the Social Commemoration of Warfare (June 2003) pp. 79-97.