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The Gallo-Roman Museum of Tongeren has announced that on Friday, it will reveal the place where the Aduatuci were defeated (57 BCE). The story can be read here, with photos still based on the Huy identification.

The press release (Dutch) can be found here. The only clue the museum offers is that the identification is based on the geographical distribution of coin hoards. I hope they can also show some of the siege works, because so far, Caesar's presence in Belgium (and Germany and Britain) has not been confirmed by archaeology.

This campaign is not to be confused with Atuatuca, where Ambiorix annihilated the Fourteenth Legion (in 54/53). We will know more on Friday!

***Update, Thursday***
A journalist tells me the name of the site, which is not completely surprising, as it is mentioned in Fichtl's list of Belgic oppida.
Ahh, you had me excited there for a moment, but the spelling had me confused!
This is still very interesting news, thanks!
Quote:Ahh, you had me excited there for a moment ...
Just for a moment?! Confusedhock: But, of course, you've seen it all before, Caesar! :wink:

Quote:I hope they can also show some of the siege works, because so far, Caesar's presence in Belgium (and Germany and Britain) has not been confirmed by archaeology.
Me, too! (In Britain, Bigbury hillfort has been suggested as the scene of BGall. 5.9, but -- as you say -- no confirmation.)
I think I am not breaking the embargo if I tell that there is indeed evidence that there were Roman legionaries. Whether this includes siege works, I do not know yet.
The site is THUIN, west of Charleroi. More news here (in Dutch): sling stones prove that the Romans were the attackers (and not defending themselves).

[Image: thuin.jpg]
Thanks, Jona!

Quote:sling stones prove that the Romans were the attackers
For the avoidance of confusion, they seem to be lead sling bullets ("loden Romeinse slingerkogels").
Of course, bullets.

My very own comments (also in Dutch) here.
Today, I visited the site. Here are four photos.

This is the wall, mentioned by Caesar, where the Aduatuci tried to fight against the Romans. on the map (above), it's in the northeast
[attachment=4600]thuin_bon_dieu_NE_2.jpg[/attachment]

Another photo of the same wall:
[attachment=4601]thuin_bon_dieu_NE_3.jpg[/attachment]

There were rocks in the southern part
[attachment=4602]thuin_bon_dieu_S_rocks_3.jpg[/attachment]

Finally, the northern slope. Here, one hoard of gold coins was found.
[attachment=4603]thuin_bon_dieu_N_4.jpg[/attachment]
Quote:.......... sling stones prove that the Romans were the attackers (and not defending themselves).
....

I'd like to highlight this for a general knowledge question to any and all out there.... :wink:

I have seen similar 'statements' on a whole range of topics before - but, in this case, why does the presence of sling bullets prove that the Romans were the attackers?

Does this mean that the bullets were distributed in a pattern that suggests they were employed by the attacker and the attacker was Roman (as they were 'Roman inscribed')? Or is there some additional assumption that the Romans didn't use slings in defensive actions?

I must admit that I've seen rather a few 'proofs' recently that are actually nothing more than 'implications', or 'conjecture', or just 'one interpretation'. Archaeology is all sadly limited to what we actually find on/in the ground - but the actual reasons for what is found could range from the simple and sublime to the outlandishly ridiculous, but in fact true.... Big Grin
Quote:Does this mean that the bullets were distributed in a pattern that suggests they were employed by the attacker and the attacker was Roman (as they were 'Roman inscribed')?
Yes, that's it. The bullets are undoubtedly Roman, and they were thrown into the citadel.
Quote:
Mark Hygate post=316214 Wrote:Does this mean that the bullets were distributed in a pattern that suggests they were employed by the attacker and the attacker was Roman (as they were 'Roman inscribed')?
Yes, that's it. The bullets are undoubtedly Roman, and they were thrown into the citadel.

Thank you - as they say, accurate context is everything! Big Grin