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Full Version: Polyaenus\' translation by R. Shepard
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Just a tip guys... for all of you who want to read Polyaenus, stay away from this translation! It is criminally flawed, misleading and incomplete. "Troy" was truer to Homer's masterpiece than this work is to the real text of Polyaenus. I just felt the need to warn you since I saw that it was the only translation readily available on the net (at least the only one I came across) and I am sure that many of you who cannot read Ancient Greek have made the mistake to read this 200+ year old crap...

Please.. grab yourself a newer, better edition and read the whole darn thing again... The mistakes are really shocking!
This is the R. Shepard translation, unfortunately...
I doubt that you'll find any version of Polyaenus online that isn't Shepard's version. A book can't be made publicly available until copyright runs out and AFAIK Shepard's translation is the only one that is out of copyright. Unfortunately, if you want a decent translation then you have to pay for a more recent one or look in a library.
Quote:This is the R. Shepard translation, unfortunately...
I was under the impression that Andrew Smith of Attalus had tried to correct some of Shepard's errors; but I've never had a proper sit-down with the Greek text to confirm or deny this.

Perhaps you should create a new online translation, George! :wink:
Well, certainly someone should, Duncan... btw, look up 4.3.21. (Alexander vs. Pittacus) An extremely interesting passage to translate and interpret. I read three translations and none conformed to what I understood from the text. A discussion about it might prove really interesting. Of course Shepard's is totally off the mark (and the point where my frustration with him took over)...

Btw... It seems that I mistakingly created this thread in the wrong area, could one of the admins move it to Greek military history?...
Originally I was going to comment on problems with interpretation, lexicography etc but I lost the post because I fell asleep lol.

I did want to echo what Duncan said, sort of. Get a group project growing, they can lead to extraordinary things. Group working was an essential part of solving Linear B, it's been essential to the Homeric multiform project etc.

It can be refreshing, fun, and if you have enough people will go quicker. I bet I could rope one graduate student studying historiography into for you too.