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Some time ago I started posting to Flickr the tombstone photos I took on a trip down the Rhine in 1982. These are mostly black and white – my colour slide camera had a knackered meter, I only discovered when I returned, but hey, they're stone-coloured, so use your imagination – and many are close-up details of equipment etc.

This all ground to a halt when I lost/misplaced the negative carrier for my slide scanner. One of the advantages of having moved house recently is that I have rediscovered many such missing items, including said negative carrier. Therefore, over the next few months, I am going to resume uploading these tombstone photos, and to whet your appetites I have just added C. Largennius to my Tombstone set. Here's a taster:

[Image: 6598820797_45e5e2f06c.jpg]

Mike Bishop
Brilliant! Great details, this is very useful. Thank you!

PS: I'm just about to order Roman military equipment this afternoon.. :wink:
Quote:PS: I'm just about to order Roman military equipment this afternoon.. :wink:
Hopefully the scratch-and-sniff edition ;-)

Forgot to say last time that the RSS feed (which will update those interested with the latest additions to the Tombstones set) is here. The more general one for my Flickr photostream (so it includes stuff like Hadrian's Wall, legionary fortresses, roads, and even the odd aircraft) is to be found here.

Finally, here's C. Valerius Crispus' shield boss.

[Image: 6610892655_30cfa3f4aa.jpg]

Mike Bishop
Got sidetracked from scanning negatives and have added three woodcuts from J. E. Price's On A Bastion of London Wall (which is available for download from archive.org): the Camomile St Soldier, Favonius Facilis, and L. Duccius Rufinus. Dating to the 19th century they are of course out of copyright (although Flickr has no appropriate licence for this).

[Image: 6660689811_f17af6dcd5_m.jpg][Image: 6660689117_6a74cc715d_m.jpg][Image: 6660688515_ddc67c0913_m.jpg]

Mike Bishop
Everybody knows which side the dagger and sword were worn upon during the 1st century AD, don't they? This little chap from Bonn would like to throw a spanner in the works:
[Image: 6707939039_7a684f2cea_m.jpg]

Compare him with the centurion Favonius Facilis from Colchester.

[Image: 6660688515_ddc67c0913.jpg]

Ooops! There are also a couple of metopes on the Tropaeum Traiana that seem to show auxiliaries wearing their swords on the 'wrong' side, IIRC, but I can't quickly find images to link to.

It all makes for an interesting life ;-)

Mike Bishop
When looking at those pictures you show of the little chap from Bonn would he not of course hold an officer type status being a standard bearer.
What can tend to also confuse is when we read Josephus in regard to a soldiers weapons, are we to take it as being what Josephus sees looking directly at a soldier, or is it his interpretation of his own right and left.
That may sound a bit confusing however when one looks at something straight on Your left can be the total opposite to what the soldier is wearing on His left.

Confusing I know.
Yes, Brian, that's always been the question: "your left or my left?"
You've made a good observation!
Quote:When looking at those pictures you show of the little chap from Bonn would he not of course hold an officer type status being a standard bearer.
He is in fact holding two shafts, like most of the auxiliary infantry on Rhineland tombstones, so I don't think he is a standard bearer.

Quote:What can tend to also confuse is when we read Josephus in regard to a soldiers weapons, are we to take it as being what Josephus sees looking directly at a soldier, or is it his interpretation of his own right and left.
The interesting point is that most of the Rhineland soldiers wear the sword on (their!) right hip, but this chap has it on his left. The Josephus quote is a wonderful red herring, I'm afraid, which can be used to support either favoured side.

Mike Bishop
Herring stew for lunch then? In red sauce, of course.
8-)
Not wanting to be argumentative Mike, but I only see one shaft in Bonn-mans' hand! :?

Quote:[ Finally, here's C. Valerius Crispus' shield boss.

[Image: 6610892655_30cfa3f4aa.jpg]

Mike Bishop

What do you see there?
Quote:Not wanting to be argumentative Mike, but I only see one shaft in Bonn-mans' hand! :?

What do you see there?
Clearly two. Its in my notes too from the inspection.

[attachment=2666]shaftsdetail.jpg[/attachment]

Mike Bishop
I think I am inclined to agree with Byron on one shaft, there is of course a line showing on this shaft but I do not think it represent two of.
Then we have to think just what might have been at the top end of such a shaft.
Quote:I think I am inclined to agree with Byron on one shaft, there is of course a line showing on this shaft but I do not think it represent two of.
These things are always easier to judge when you see the real thing, rather than just a picture. There are two shafts represented.

Mike Bishop
Byron
Where you raise the point about the shield boss can it be a decorative one with the head of a capricorn.
Mike.

I have just been into the data base and looked at the tombstone of Firmus at Bonn, so I can now see the point you are making. (or two points)
In fact there should be two points here however the top ends of the spears are missing on this tombstone.
Very interesting and sorry Byron changed my mind.
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