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Hang on, let me just turn up my pomposity by one notch...<br>
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<strong>An important resource for the study of the Roman occupation of Scotland becomes available in a new form today with the appearance on the web of James Curle's landmark 1911 book <em>A Roman Frontier Post and Its People: The Fort of Newstead in the Parish of Melrose</em>.<br>
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Prepared by The Armatura Press for The Trimontium Trust - with funding from The Heritage Lottery Fund, Tweed Forum, and others who have contributed to Phase II of the Tweed Rivers Interpretation Project - this digital version retains the original pagination of Curle's book.<br>
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The pages of Curle's huge tome (432 + xix pp, with 61 text figures, 100 plates, and 4 plans) have been scanned, converted into text, and had hyperlinks added wherever cross-references appear (as in, for example, the index). The online edition of Curle can be found at:<br>
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www.curlesnewstead.org.uk</strong><br>
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The only thing better than reading press releases is writing them ;-)<br>
<br>
Mike Bishop <p></p><i></i>
Quote:</em></strong><hr>The pages of Curle's huge tome ... have been scanned<hr><br>
Did he really write Septimus Severus on page 77? <p></p><i></i>
<em>Did he really write Septimus Severus on page 77?</em><br>
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Yup - just checked my dead-tree version.<br>
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There are quite a few boo-boos in the original, but that is true of <em>all</em> books except the Gutenberg 42-line bible, which is allegedly the only printed book free of literals. Errors in the OCR process (such as the repeated appearance of Dragendorif for Dragendorff) tend to be all of the same type and many of them deriving from the fact that the number 1 looks like a capital I in the Caslon font in which the book was set.<br>
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If anybody spots any errors, let me know, and I will put the originals on a Corrigenda page and correct those that are down to me or my OCR software.<br>
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Mike Bishop <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

Wow!<br>
<br>
This is really wonderful. I think a little pomposity is justified here... I am anxiously awaiting the full pdf version. I was also wondering what's the latest with the new B&C, and Robinson?<br>
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Quintus Florentius<br>
<p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=jaredfleury>jaredfleury</A> at: 6/13/04 10:32 pm<br></i>

Anonymous

Ave Dr. Bishop,<br>
<br>
I've been perusing through Curle, in particular this time around the leather section (chapt. 9 pics after page 150, plate xix). I'm very curious to know your take on those patches, tie patches, and pockets. On the one hand, the tie patches seem very well suited to tent construction, and in fact look very much like what appears on Dr. Junkelmans tents, yet it discusses them as "clothing" ties (unless I've misread-entirely possible). Would this, inconjunction with the mention of short or knee length leather tunics, mean these are pieces of subarmalis? Or, is it being suggested that the actual tunics were leather. Or are these perhaps just tie points for cloaks, where all the accompanying woven fabric has dissappeared? And the pockets? How might those be incoporated into a tunic, or are they perhaps even pants pockets? I suppose if a tunic was closely fitted around the torso, you could include a pocket which would remain accessible. A loosely fit leather tunic would seem to take too much valuable material, and be far too bulky to be practical anyway.<br>
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Thanks, Jared Fleury<br>
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<p></p><i></i>
Is anyone else having trouble viewing the Curle site on a Mac? (I use one at work). I haven't checked to see if I can look at it at home on my PC, but here at work all I get is a blank page.<br>
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T. Flavius Crispus<br>
Legio VI VPF<br>
CA USA <p></p><i></i>
<em>Is anyone else having trouble viewing the Curle site on a Mac? (I use one at work).</em><br>
<br>
Can you provide details of OS (9 or X) and browser? It should work with IE, Safari, or any Mozilla derivative, but I'll look into it if you can be more specific.<br>
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Mike Bishop <p></p><i></i>
Hi, Mike.<br>
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I'm using Mac OS 9.2 and IE 5 for Mac. I tried it again just now and got the same result: Blank page.<br>
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T. Flavius Crispus<br>
<p></p><i></i>
<em>I'm using Mac OS 9.2 and IE 5 for Mac. I tried it again just now and got the same result: Blank page.</em><br>
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Wierd - IE5 for Mac is CSS compatible (just!) and it should render without problems. Are you sure it is not a proxy or firewall issue actually blocking your access to the page? What do you see if you look at page source?<br>
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Mike Bishop <p></p><i></i>
when using Mozilla firefox, the pages refuse to show the bottom several lines. I don't know how many lines are obscured, but it seems to be the bottom inch or 3 centimeters of the page. 5 to 10 lines of information.<br>
I have adjusted my screen size, and closes out the toolbars but still seem to miss some of the information.<br>
<p></p><i></i>
<em>when using Mozilla firefox, the pages refuse to show the bottom several lines. I don't know how many lines are obscured, but it seems to be the bottom inch or 3 centimeters of the page. 5 to 10 lines of information.<br>
<br>
I have adjusted my screen size, and closes out the toolbars but still seem to miss some of the information.</em><br>
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This is a 'feature' of the current Gecko rendering engine (in Firefox 0.8 and not fixed in 0.9) - if you're very lucky you get a double vertical scrollbar too! When I wrote the original stylesheet, conforming to all the standards, it looked fine with Gecko but IE refused to play ball (because of the way it mishandled position:fixed). Therefore I had to kludge it to work with IE and at that point Gecko started to look less than satisfactory.<br>
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You can get to see the bottom of any page in Firefox (which has been my browser of choice for some time) by using the page down key (having first clicked within the page). If the MS browser was standards compliant this would never have happened.<br>
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Mike Bishop <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

Mike,<br>
<br>
Many thanks for doing this- a fantastic resource and really appreciated.<br>
One small thing- in the chapter on Arms and Armour, I think page 166 got missed out?<br>
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Regards,<br>
<br>
Paulus <p></p><i></i>
No, it's there – honest, guv!<br>
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www.curlesnewstead.org.uk/166.htm<br>
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From what point of origin were you trying to reach it (there might be a broken link I need to fix)?<br>
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Mike Bishop <p></p><i></i>
Great work.<br>
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This is what I mean "web is a great improvement for culture"!<br>
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I hope to see many more examples of these stuff, so very well made. <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

Mike Bishop wrote "No, it's there – honest, guv!" Thanks Mike!<br>
I downloaded the pdf to print out of this chapter.<br>
Fascinating stuff- for example the padding on the inside of helmets which ( I suspect) was subsequently "cleaned" by over zealous curators.<br>
I also found the list of helmets at the back of this chapter fascinating. Some I didn't recognise- does anyone know where they ended up?<br>
Really appreciate your hard work here, Mike- invaluable!<br>
<br>
Paulus <p></p><i></i>
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