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Syme's The Roman Revolution is now more than seventy years old. Is there a good new synthesis of the story of the transformation from the Republic to the Empire?
Gruen's Last Generation of the Roman Republic (1974) is commonly cited as a 'response' to Syme, and takes issue with some of his ideas, but it's hardly 'new' either...

Then again, there's always Rubicon - we all know how much you love Tom Holland! :twisted: Richard Miles called it "the most readable book on the later Roman republic since Ronald Syme's The Roman Revolution" (Guardian Review) :wink: (Haven't read it myself so I couldn't comment...)

I know Syme took an (understandably) partisan view, and perhaps his picture of the era is no longer held to be quite tenable in some circles, but Roman Revolution is such an outstanding book that I think we might have to wait another few years yet before it's equalled....

- Nathan
Quote:Roman Revolution is such an outstanding book that I think we might have to wait another few years yet before it's equalled...
Yes, that's what I suspect as well, and that's why I'm not surprised that I don't know a successor. Nevertheless, there may be such a book.
you can allways read the sources and interpretat your self - work like an historian Big Grin


Plutarch

Jugurthine War

Suetonius (the part about Caesar)

Caesar himself

and much more
Quote:you can allways read the sources and interpretat your self
Your answer is even better than you think. I am writing an article on Velleius Paterculus, and need to offer "suggestions for further reading". I had already decided to refer to the Penguin Appian.

Ross Cowan

J. Osgood, Caesar's Legacy: Civil War and the Emergence of the Roman Empire (CUP 2006), is worth reading.

Review:

[url:2pyp4o00]http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2006/2006-10-30.html[/url]

Excerpt:

[url:2pyp4o00]http://assets.cambridge.org/97805218/55822/excerpt/9780521855822_excerpt.pdf[/url]

Cheers,

R!
Quote:J. Osgood, Caesar's Legacy: Civil War and the Emergence of the Roman Empire (CUP 2006), is worth reading.
I'm off to the bookshop!
This series really isn't known for groundbreaking new ideas, I think, but I've always found them to be excellent overviews and they seem to rarely, if ever, miss any important academic debate.

Cambridge Ancient History, The Last Age of the Roman Republic 146 - 43 BC

They also detail the best of current scholarship (as of publication, at least). By reading an earlier book in the series was how I found T.J. Cornell, who is one of my favourite early-Rome historians now.
For a different take on the whole thing, I'd highly recommend Harriet Flower's Roman Republics.
I have to agree with Nathan: Tom Holland's "Rubicon" is a good summary, but intended for a general reader. 'Maty' Matyszak's "Chronicle of the Roman Republic" is more in depth and has lost of photos, maps and schematics. If you're writing the article for the lay reader (Ancient Warfare Magazine?), they are probably good recommendations.
One other book on my shelf: Robert Alan Gurval's "Actium and Augustus: The Politics and Emotions of Civil War", Michigan University Press, 1995. The author examines Octavianus' Actian victory and the political and social consequences on the Principate and its public ideology.
Quote:I have to agree with Nathan: Tom Holland's "Rubicon" is a good summary, but intended for a general reader. 'Maty' Matyszak's "Chronicle of the Roman Republic" is more in depth and has lost of photos, maps and schematics. If you're writing the article for the lay reader (Ancient Warfare Magazine?), they are probably good recommendations.

Rubicon is one of my favourite books ever, and though I agree that it was targeted as a more general audience, Holland didn't pander to the general lack of knowledge of that time period. It is instead a book which touches on dozens of aspects of the time period, leaving you wanting more at the end. In my opinion, that's what a great book does! Also, it is almost written like a novel as opposed to the dry history texts we often have to read Big Grin
Rubicon has generated some fierce debates on this site. :wink: I enjoyed it personally, but I was entertained instead of informed, I think.
Quote:Rubicon has generated some fierce debates on this site. :wink: I enjoyed it personally, but I was entertained instead of informed, I think.

Well I would expect most on this site to know the info already :wink:
Quote:. . . generated some fierce debates on this site.

The size of a belt buckle could generate debate on this site. :wink: