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Hi

Is there any evidence for any other dagger type other than the Kunzing-London-Eining type? Are there any representations of any third century daggers being worn? Any evidence they were worn on the left side or the right?

Thanks for any help.

Graham.
Quote:Is there any evidence for any other dagger type other than the Kunzing-London-Eining type? Are there any representations of any third century daggers being worn? Any evidence they were worn on the left side or the right?.

Actually, there is another type of dagger (although I hesitate to use the word, for reasons that will become apparent) that turns up in Roman military contexts in the 3rd century. A rather fine example was found during the excavations at Milecastle 39 during the 1980s - I remember seeing it after it came back from conservation and I have a vague recollection of having read the report on it, although it has not as yet been published. The curious thing about this type of weapon (implement?) is that the blades were single-edged, so more a knife than a dagger. The MC39 had a fancy openwork handguard IIRC but you can find more about this type of weapon/implement/sidearm in Oldenstein's classic work* (items 1-10 on Taf.9, and pp.87-9 where he is concentrating on the copper-alloy hilt fittings, but it is the same class of artefact).

*Oldenstein, J. 1976: 'Zur Ausrüstung römischer Auxiliareinheiten', Bericht der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission 57, 49-284

Mike Bishop
With respect to representations you may want to consult:

Ubl, H.J., 1994, Wann verschwand der Dolch vom römischen Militaerguertel in: -Carnap-Bornheim, C. v. (Hrsg.), 1994; Beiträge zu römischer und barbarischer Bewaffnung in den ersten vier nachchristlichen Jahrhunderten. Akten des 2. Internationalen Kolloquiums in Marburg a. d. Lahn, 20. bis 24. Februar 1994, Lublin/Marburg, 137-144

I do not have this before me but if I recollect correctly he discusses a relief from Regensburg, a very bad picture of which can be found in this document

[url:23k9vy40]http://www.uni-regensburg.de/Universitaet/Pressemitteilungen/Pressemitteilungen/0708_Juli/Donaulimes.pdf[/url]

Based on this relief he, I believe, concludes that - because the daggers are worn on the right side and apparently without a sword, they had become a ceremonial type of equipment rather than actual weapons at this date. This conclusion (if I recollect his arguments correctly) appears rather far fetched to me.

If you need a copy of the article, send me a PM and I can get it within a few days.