RomanArmyTalk

Full Version: lost book collections
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Caius and I were talking book collections. Although it may seem morbid, we were pondering the question of what happens to their collections when a Roman scholar or other avid collector of books 'shuffles off this mortal coil'. What are some of the good libraries that might be willing to peruse the books and give them a home? The classics prof's at Va Tech say I have a better collection, even such as it is, on the Roman army than their entire library.<br>
Perhaps we need to do a matching library/bequest effort (not to push anyone prematurely). <p></p><i></i>
I have left instructions in my will that all my books on Rome are to go to my alma mater, Portland State University in Oregon.<br>
<br>
Although Jasper's trying really hard to make me re-write it so he gets some! E EM<br>
<br>
Cheers<br>
Jenny <p></p><i></i>
No, no, no, leave it to FAMS (and a small downpayment for storage please) <p>Greets<BR>
<BR>
Jasper</p><i></i>
I wonder how you could find interested libraries/classics/history departments that would like to get these.<br>
I wonder if Dr. Bishop might give his thoughts?<br>
<p></p><i></i>
One of the problems I have found as a "library volunteer" is that many libraries will smilingly take your books, and then later sell them off as a fund raiser. Even some of the better universities "cull" books, either selling them or just throwing them in the trash! This is usually for books that haven't been checked out in a while.<br>
What we probably should do is start planning for a museum and library, somewhere for all of those who have collections of artifacts and books, to bequeath to a central location, where scholars can come and research and interested people can view. With the projected future of travel (compared to the previous 50 years) almost anywhere would be a good place, if there was a controlled climate and a nearby travel hub.<br>
Government and private grants could be sourced for funding, and the museum and library could be in an underground complex, under a 1/1 replica Roman fort and vicus..... if we could get grants and donations. There's a project for someone! <p></p><i></i>
Oooh, sounds good. In fact, something like that would be exactly what I'd do if I'd won the lottery! <p>Greets<BR>
<BR>
Jasper</p><i></i>

Anonymous

Oh man, the lottery....heck, I'd have a huge roman fort that could house a full cohort, then I'd invite everyone in the world who did Roman re-enactmenting, and have a big week long exercise......in sunny Costa Rica....lol<br>
That would be interesting to have a central learning area for Roman literature and related materials...it would also be nice if private collectors donated their collection to this central hub. (Hey, we could make it in Costa Rica with my fort!)<br>
<br>
<p>Tiberius Lantanius Magnus<BR>
CO/Optio,<BR>
Legio XXX "Ulpia Victrix"<BR>
(Matt)</p><i></i>
I was talking with Jane Hall (chairman of the US National Latin Exam) last night, and she says Mary Washington College would be glad to take books. However, it might also be a good idea, since most classics departments and certainly the librarians, don’t know what constitutes a good collection, to make up a recommended book collection that can be used to guide acquisitions. I think Sander has a great start<br>
www.geocities.com/richsc5...ander.html<br>
however he says this list is just based on discussions here. It might be a very worthwhile RAT effort to make a list of ~200 ‘best’ books that every college should have. Think this is doable? <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

Hey everybody, what to here something incredibly depressing?<br>
I myself own more and better books than the entire public library system in my town outside Chicago. Pretty big libraries too, three of them now for a town of 130,000. <p></p><i></i>