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I recently finished reading Donald Kagan's The Peloponnesian War - that is to say the smaller, single-volume comprehensive history and not the earlier, multivolume series - and was quite thoroughly impressed with it. Though perhaps a bit slow to start, the book lives up to its goal to give the general reader a comprehensive history of the war in a single, easy-to-read volume, but without falling into the trap of making it feel "dumbed down" which most comprehensive histories tend towards. Having completed that book, I found myself interested in the period immediately following the war down. At university I had studied the "Classical Period" (that is to say down to the conclusion of the aforementioned war) and had also studied the period from the death of Phillip to the death of Alexander, but had only been introduced to the intervening period in brief without much detail, and yet the period seems absolutely fascinating! Aside from the obvious political turmoil and fallout following the Peloponnesian War, we also see the rise and fall of Thebean hegemony, the "return" of Atheninan power (albeit much reduced), the Anabasis of Xenophon, and such great battles as Leuctra and Mantinea, and yet I seem unable to find a single or even dual volume history for the period aside from the ancient, namely Xenophon's Hellenica.

So my question is: Can anybody point me to or at least in the direction of a modern, comprehensive history that covers, roughly, from the end of the Peloponnesian War to roughly the battle of Chaeronea in 338? This is rough, of course, and histories which cover a smaller portions of said period are certainly welcome! I am thinking of something somewhat in the spirit of the aforementioned book by Kagan, Adrian Goldsworthy's The Fall of Carthage, or even Robert Syme's The Roman Revolution - basically, something I can read on the subway on the way to work. 8)
Alright, well, based on some independent research and numerous internet searches, it appears that the 4th Century is one of those periods in time that has fallen "between the cracks" of history, and thus it appears that a concise history of the period is unavailable. So let's switch gears. Were one to read about this period, one ought to read Xenophon's Hellenica. Are there an particular translations or editions anybody recommends? I've heard good things about this Landmark series, but it's a touch on the large side for carrying on Metro - though it's certainly not completely out of the question. Any recommendations or suggestions?
This is what you're looking for: The Greek World In The Fourth Century, L. Tritle

These may also be of interest:

-Xenophon's Retreat: Greece, Persia, and the End of the Golden Age, by Robin Waterfield
-Central Greece and the Politics of Power in the Fourth Century BC, by John Buckler and Hans Beck
-Athens After the Peloponnesian War: Class, Faction and Policy, 403-386 Bc, by Barry S. Strauss


Hope that helps Big Grin

Pedro
Quote:Can anybody point me to or at least in the direction of a modern, comprehensive history that covers, roughly, from the end of the Peloponnesian War to roughly the battle of Chaeronea in 338?
Have you read Simon Hornblower's The Greek world, 479-323 BC (ISBN 9780416750003)? It appeared in 1983 and has been republished at least twice, both times updated. It is excellent.
Hey, thanks for the responses! Big Grin And here I was, ready to give up, the fourth century BCE being one of those "fallen between the cracks" eras in history...
I will undoubtedly check out Tritle and Hornblower!

Any suggestions regarding a translation of Xenophon?
The most 'portable' versions of Xenophon for reading on the subway are probably the 'Penguin Classics' paperback version:
Xenophon's "Anabasis" is available as "The Persian Expedition", and his "Hellenica" as "A History of my times".....

The books by J.K. Anderson, while not general histories are also very good, especially his "Military Theory and Practise in the age of Xenophon", which covers many of the battles etc and also his biography of Xenophon, called "Xenophon"...
Quote:Any suggestions regarding a translation of Xenophon?
Definitely the Landmark Xenophon -- no shadow of a doubt. Bob Strassler's Landmark editions are excellent.
So I suppose my instincts were right to aim for the Landmark series. I guess I'll just wait for Christmas and ask for it then, since it'll be out in paperback by then - along with the Landmark Anabasis of Alexander! Big Grin

Thanks, all!
Quote:So I suppose my instincts were right to aim for the Landmark series.
Definitely worth struggling onto the Metro with this one. You will never spend 26 bucks more wisely!
Quote:You will never spend 26 bucks more wisely!
I beg to differ. If you throw 26 bucks into the Trevi fountain, on 26 occasions, you will return 26 times to Rome. Now, that's what I call a sound investment. :wink:
Quote: you will return 26 times to Rome. Now, that's what I call a sound investment. :wink:
Agreed, my friend!
I think Robin Waterfield also made a recent translation of the Anabasis, after writing the book "Xenophon's retreat".
Quote:I think Robin Waterfield also made a recent translation of the Anabasis, after writing the book "Xenophon's retreat".
Thanks for posting this one -- I had completely missed it: The Expedition of Cyrus (Waterfield, 2009). But no Hellenica.
Glad to be of help. Smile
Lucius (Saul),

I, too, am fascinated with the "Age of Xenophon" and have done a lot of research on the period in my History MA program. Here are a few books that you may find helpful (directly looted from one of my papers' bibliographies):

Anderson, J.K. Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon. Berkley: University of California Press, 1970. (Already noted above, but very much worth mentioning again. You may have to go to a library as finding it for sale - especially at an affordable price - is very difficult).

Cartledge, Paul. Agesilaos and the Crisis of Sparta. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987

Hamilton, Charles D. Agesilaus and the Failure of Spartan Hegemony. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991.

________. Sparta’s Bitter Victories: Politics and Diplomacy in the Corinthian War. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1979.

Hope you find these helpful and good luck in your quest for knowledge!
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