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I hard started a thread previously to try and find a phrase (or at least three words) into Latin, but there were no takers. I'm now finding myself needing to translate another phrase. My question is, does anyone know of a good online source for translation (preferably free)? Is there a person here on the forums that is willing to translate?

I've never taken Latin up before but I'm starting to look into it. I've picked up a couple books and am going to try and learn it (at least the very basics of it). Anything in particular I should be reading, or buying? I'm hoping for something I can do a little each day and not be overwhelmed with a course or books that requires a degree just to read. Tongue

Anyhow, would love some help with this. I'm not needing like I said two phrases or at least series of words and the translators Google found in a search were of little help.
Quote:My question is, does anyone know of a good online source for translation (preferably free)?
I've never found one.

Quote:I'm not needing like I said two phrases or at least series of words and the translators Google found in a search were of little help.
Why not post the phrases? There may be a taker this time.
Well, the original phrase from the last thread was:

"Honor, Courage, Strength"

I've found a lot of meanings for each word and each one seems to be correct only at certain times (depended on who is saying it, and the context of the sentence).

I'm also trying to find out how one translate "of the" and what word needs to be first.

Ex. "Man of the Woods"

Would the woods, or man be first, and my understanding is there is no "the". Apparently "of" shows up as "ab", "ex" and "de"? But what's appropriate and when I guess is my question.

Latin is very confusing.
Most often, in a case like "man of the woods", there wouldn't be a separate preposition, but the genitive would take its place. I don't have my dictionary here, as I'm in a (business meeting preceding the) weaving seminar with my wife. I'm the only guy here...yikes. Estrogen is ankle deep here...

But "vir" is man, nominative singular, and forest is "silva", so Man of the Forest would be "vir silvae", iirc. For a "man from the forest", it might be "vir de silvam" if just "from" or "vir ex silvam" if a "man OUT OF the forest".

Hey, Latin wasn't confusing to Cicero...what's our problem??
Sometimes it is nice to find a similar phrase and copy it. Ovid refers to Diana as dea silvarum. So copy this and translate your phrase as vir silvarum. I think you would find it more natural to use the genitive plural silvarum, rather than the genitive simgular silvae. As far as prepositions, use ex silva if you want to imply motion.

Horace refers to woodsmen (modern lumberjacks) as homines silvestres.

Kevin
So does every phrase like that follow in suit? Man of Honor, Man of Steel for example don't translate the "of"? So, if I had say, "Men of the Wars" I wouldn't translate the "of the" but just the rest?
Quote:Well, the original phrase from the last thread was: "Honor, Courage, Strength".
I've found a lot of meanings for each word and each one seems to be correct only at certain times (depended on who is saying it, and the context of the sentence).
Did you see my reply to your other thread last week? (I know there are various possibilities, but I thought mine was pretty close.)
Quote:Man of Honor, Man of Steel for example don't translate the "of"?
It's not that you don't translate it, T.J. It's just that, in Latin, "of steel" is one word. (Confusing?)