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Anonymous

I need some help on how to put on a toga. I have searched the net and found limited instructions. I would realy like a step by step explanation. No details left out. Pictures or diagrams would be great. Thank you. Aug33 <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

Last year I had Julie from La Wren's Nest make me a republican era toga. A key aspect of a true toga is the material from which it is made. I used a light weight wool flannel. The shape is important as well. The bottom is curved. Here's a picture of me wearing it at Nashville:<br>
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66.66.131.145/roman/Nashv...Draped.jpg<br>
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When putting it on it helps to have an slave at the ready. Sometimes I can wrap the toga myself. This is what I do:<br>
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1. Fold the toga a bit length wise and about at the toga's mid-point bunch it up underneath your right shoulder.<br>
2. Going about you back, drape one end over your left arm<br>
3. Toss the remainding porton that's extending in front of you from your right arm over your left shoulder. If you did the length wise folding right the toga should extend behind you back almost to your ankles.<br>
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Remember that these directions really only apply to togas of the republic and early principate. Later period togas, 2nd century and on, are different and are wrapped differently.<br>
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I do about the same, except that I start by folding the Republican toga lengthwise over about 5/8th and 3/8ths then hold one end under my left arm, wrapping around my right front, under the right arm, then over the back coming up to over the left shoulder and creating a sinus or fold. You end up holding the rest of the end over your left arm. If you want to use a toga pin where it can't be seen, it works well, but you can wrap the toga, (especially with your slave helping) so that you can wear it for several hours with no problems.<br>
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If you are going to the baths, the toilet or dinner, your slave will help you unwrap, and then hold or fold your toga and guard it until you return. You should not attempt to run or make any undignified movements while wearing the symbol of roman citizenship, I mean, we don't want to look like barbarians, do we?<br>
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The real help is in the cloth, using a lightweight wool instead of any other material makes all the difference.<br>
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<p>"Just before class started, I looked in the big book where all the world's history is written, and it said...." Neil J. Hackett, PhD ancient history, professor OSU, </p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=caiusfabius>Caius Fabius</A> <IMG HEIGHT=10 WIDTH=10 SRC="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ROMANISROMANORVM/files/C%20Fabius%201988b.jpg" BORDER=0> at: 1/31/05 11:19 pm<br></i>

Anonymous

You shouldn't need to use pins. I'll have to check my copy of Wilson to see whether your wrapping method makes sense. It's basically the reverse of what I do. <p></p><i></i>
No, of course you do NOT need pins, but if you are doing a film shoot, where you have to keep going back and forth up and down stairs, sitting and standing, over and over, and you don't have a slave, one "replica toga pin" at the right place (hidden under the sinus fold) can really make life easier.<br>
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In figures 9-11 of Dr Lillian Wilson's book, the left arm is shown free of the toga, with the right arm being bound up in the sinus. I looked back at some photos and I did tell the whole process in mirror image. That's what I get for usually having someone else wrap it for me, I don't pay enough attention. I have the whole book scanned but it is on another computer, not connected to the internet. The book actually shows the stages of wrapping various togas and the patterns for various togas.<br>
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togate Caius<br>
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I could probably copy the book to CD-ROM as is, but you have to open each page as a jpeg on your viewer. A friend suggested that I convert it all into html and create a linked e-book, and sell it, but I think the copyright must belong to someone and I don't want to violate copyright laws. <p>"Just before class started, I looked in the big book where all the world's history is written, and it said...." Neil J. Hackett, PhD ancient history, professor OSU, </p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=caiusfabius>Caius Fabius</A> <IMG HEIGHT=10 WIDTH=10 SRC="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ROMANISROMANORVM/files/C%20Fabius%201988b.jpg" BORDER=0> at: 1/31/05 11:51 pm<br></i>

Anonymous

Though my toga is of republican size, I haven't yet taken time to figure out how to get the appearance of figures 9 to 13. For now I'm using the simpler wrap of figures 5 and 6. <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=neuralmancer>Neuralmancer</A> at: 2/1/05 1:44 am<br></i>

Anonymous

I could realy use some diagrams. I would like to have it like the one of Augustus where it is drapped over his head. thanks <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

Do you a toga with enough material to form the sinus over your head? If you don't then your not going to be able create the over the head look. Not all togas are the same.<br>
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Alot of questions could be answered if we had Lillian Wilson's drawings and photos on the web. It's an old book, 1924 copyright. Is someone still claiming rights or is this work now in the public domain? <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=neuralmancer>Neuralmancer</A> at: 2/1/05 4:57 am<br></i>
I wish I knew that answer. I can download my scanned copy to CD, but it doesn't take up that much space in Jpeg format, so you are left with a mostly empty CD. I added it to my Roman Tour 2002 Cd-ROM, but now that it is going to be sold commercially, I left off anything I didn't own the copyright to.<br>
It is a wonderful help for making and wearing a toga.<br>
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<p>"Just before class started, I looked in the big book where all the world's history is written, and it said...." Neil J. Hackett, PhD ancient history, professor OSU, </p><i></i>