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Quote:In the meantime the latest issue of 'Ancient Warfare' has a rather interesting reconstruction of mine which might be of interest, in particular to those of you who follow the Tunic Colour debate. Just to whet your appetite - archaeological evidence of a soldier with surviving traces of coloured wool on his body!!!

Graham.

Just wanted to say that this article and the illustration was quite superb. The details - how the pugio and the gladius were attached to the belts- were eyeopening for me. Many thanks!

Cheers

Caballo
Hi Caballo

Glad you liked it.

In my reconstruction I am not sure that the sword scabbard decoration overlaid over the scabbard comes across that clear. Essentially a decorated vertical belt overlaid and hiding the usual scabbard decoration underneath! Now that you see it archaeologically you can have fun looking at old favourite sculptures to see if something similar exists elsewhere and as Raffaele points out it does on at least one well known tombstone, that of Daverzus. Obviously there are elements of my reconstruction that could be experimented with and improved upon if and when someone comes to make a replica. Nevertheless I hope it gives some people food for thought.

In the meantime with a bag of stakes and a hammer I am convinced he was not a marine but a Vampire Slayer!! Smile I am sure someone can make a story out of this!

Graham.
Hi Graham,

You're right- and I found myself wishing that the illustration of the sword was much bigger to look more at the detail. Not just the decoration- for example, were the rings on the pommel for decoration or to attach a thong of leather as a wrist loop?

Cheers

Caballo
"You're right- and I found myself wishing that the illustration of the sword was much bigger to look more at the detail. Not just the decoration- for example, were the rings on the pommel for decoration or to attach a thong of leather as a wrist loop?"

Hi Caballo,
The rings of the pommel were not for decoration but they could be have used to attach a thong of leather as a wrist loop, like it is visible on some specimens in Balkans and in Italy, and it is possible to see in the successive evolution of the sword in Byzantium, where a leather thong fashioned like a loop is clearly visible in many paintings. We cannot moreover exclude that this was also used as a further system of sword suspension.
Cheers
Raffaele
Many thanks, Raffaele and Graham,

So many questions....but limiting myself to one, I wasn't clear whether the pommel and guard of the gladius was silvered or plain wood?

Cheers

Caballo
Dear Caballo,
herewith my original text
"The oval pommel is in wood, with a horizontal circumferential iron embossing. The bone conical handgrip has got four grooves for a better grip, and it was attached to a wood bell-shaped hand guard, with an oval flattened surface covered by iron, again fitted with a double embossed circumference. Traces of silver patina still visible on the pommel and hand guard confirm that at least they were silvered.

I hope that it is clear
Ciao
Raffaele
A very nice article and drawing!
I have a few questions to you Graham and Raffaele, and would be very happy if you could answer them Smile

1st. the back side of the sword belt frog looks very similar to the backside of the "button-loop" fasteners, right? Is it in one piece with the plate or connected via a hinge? Cannot see this in the pic. Smile
2nd. Are the decorations on the plates soldered onto a flat plate, like on the plates published by K├╝nzl, or are they a single piece of sheet metal with all the decorations embossed, and the edges rolled over the metal bars with the round heads?
3rd. Is there a publication about the textiles, as to which weave pattern they were, how thick the threads were, how spun, and what kind of dye was used, and how it was dyed (process), i.e. is there a (published) textile analysis?
Thanks! Christian
I quess asking for someone to put this drawing up here, would'nt make sens... :?
The obvious answer would be: "Buy the magazine!" :mrgreen:
Are there any plans to take a year's worth of AW and bind them for sale as a volume? Seems like there would be a market for that product, especially for those who missed, say, the first year.
Now if we can just get somebody to make a replica of that "pugio." The miniature-gladius design is so different from the conventional style, yet it was carried by someone who was almost certainly a soldier or marine. Is there a breakdown of dimensions of the guard, grip, pommel and blade? The article only states overall length including scabbard. And the diamond-shaped bone insert mentioned - does the tang pass through it?
Hi Graham
You and Raffaele are to be congratulated for the article on the Herculaneum soldier. I cannot recall where one article has produced more trains of thought.

How on earth you managed to visualise the belt and vagina structure I do not know presumably without handling the originals.

I for one propose to have a ventrale made and I am sure we shall see a rash of cut down swords in the field.

I was interested to see your alternative structure for the apron. Surely it is odd if the marine lavished so much cash on his kit but left half the apron uncovered and still representing a bit of a nuisance about ship. On the other hand the short apron is normally seen as Trajanic.

Chris Haines was pleased to see the reference to the orange wool.
Hi

Thanks for the comments. It is always welcome to get positive feedback. One easy question to answer, sadly there is no publication on the textile finds.

We also have to remember that we are dealing with finds preserved in exceptional circumstances which can not be conserved in the normal way. Some pieces are fused together and it would be impossible to seperate them and study them in the way other finds might be.

Nevertheless Raffaele is to be congratulated on getting the images and it was a rare privilege to work on the reconstruction.

If Jasper has no objections I do not mind posting the reconstruction of the sword and sword belt here, for further discussion.

Graham.
Obviously part of my reason for allowing the article to increase from 4 to 6 pages was to generate more interest in the magazine among reenactors. Publishing commissioned artwork online when the ink is barely dry is perhaps a bit much. Besides, it's not like we're asking anyone to fork over the amount some traders ask for a copy of HRR! However, you own the copyright to the image Graham, so I'll leave the final decision up to you.

David, re: selling volumes as one. I don't think we'd rebind everything, as that's just a way to make it more expensive, but I suspect 'package deals' will be offered in due course.
Quote:If Jasper has no objections I do not mind posting the reconstruction of the sword and sword belt here, for further discussion.

Yes please!
Caballo can see it, he bought the issue. :wink: :wink:
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