RomanArmyTalk

Full Version: Resignation
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Anonymous

Greetings all,<br>
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Knowing that the Roman army worked significantly different than today's armies, I was wondering if a soldier could resign or leave the army after a period of time, or was it destined to be for the full 25 year term unless discharged for medical reasons. Would it be different between the Legion and the Auxiliaries? Could an officer have a greater choice inlieu of a noncom or nonrate?<br>
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Thanks. <p></p><i></i>
hmm, never heard of a soldier who retired BEFORE his time - legion or auxilia. Perhaps someone else? <p>-------------------------------------------------------<br>
Rome did not create a great empire by having meetings -- they did it by killing all those who opposed them.<br>
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</p><i></i>
Officers' careers are another thing altogether. They would switch careers between army and administrative jobs without any problem. I wouldn't know of any soldier resigning his job. Doesn't happen, unless you count desertion as such. <p>Greets<br>
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Jasper</p><i></i>

Anonymous

Thanks.<br>
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I was just curious if it was more of a type of servitude to the state/empire than a mutual agreement between parties. One can only assume the penalty for desertion would be death, so the officers would be loath to give up so much because of a change of heart sometime during their tour.<br>
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Thanks again for the clarity. <p></p><i></i>