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and another Plumbata
and another one
A new plumbata, from Serbia but on a bidding site so no geographical information. Length is 120mm, weight 70 grams.

[attachment=12427]120mm70g_1s.jpg[/attachment]
[attachment=12428]120mm70g_2s.jpg[/attachment]
[attachment=12429]120mm70g_3s.jpg[/attachment]

31 from Serbia
29 from Britain
15 from Austria
14 from France
14 from Slovenia
9 from Hungary
8 from Croatia
8 from Italy
7 from Germany
7 from Switzerland
5 from Georgia/Abchasia
3 from Rumania
3 from Bulgaria
3 from Greece
2 from Liechtenstein
2 from The Netherlands
1 from Belgium
1 from Slovakia
60 from doubtful or unprovenanced origins (up from 56)
A few quick questions.
In those cases, do you try to contact the seller to try gather some extra information ?
Regarding that plumbata, is the "darker" mark at the 6cm point a common feature on finds? And what could explain it ?

Thanks in advance
Tim I think that "mark" is just some of the corrosion that came off revealing the thinner more metallic inside.
Quote: In those cases, do you try to contact the seller to try gather some extra information ?
I do but I hardly ever get a reply (depends on the country). John, posting a few items below here, was just about the only one ever forwarding any information.
It's hardly surprising. Remember that these finds are taken from the ground almost Always without consent of the authorities (we're talking about Serbia, not the UK). And even if the findspot is legit, the seller would not be willing to share his treasure-trove with the rest of the world would he? Which leaves me with a list of 222 plumbatae, of which 163 have been published or have a 'more or less confirmed' findspot (and even less on my map).


Quote: Regarding that plumbata, is the "darker" mark at the 6cm point a common feature on finds? And what could explain it ?
As Markus said, it's the Original metal with the corrosion removed. I'm thinking the owner did that.
A few more plumbatae have come to my attention. Unfortunately none of them published, all from internet sales, so I'm 'lucky' to have the length and sometimes the weight, plus one or more images. I won't bother you with the clear fakes but here are the interesting ones:

[attachment=12476]160mm-Macedonia.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12477]133mm-54.18g_1.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12478]unknown.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12479]160mm-89g.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12480]125mm_1.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12481]153mm.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12482]143mmBalkan.jpg[/attachment]

31 from Serbia
29 from Britain
15 from Austria
14 from France
14 from Slovenia
9 from Hungary
8 from Croatia
8 from Italy
7 from Germany
7 from Switzerland
5 from Georgia/Abchasia
3 from Rumania
3 from Bulgaria
3 from Greece
2 from Liechtenstein
2 from The Netherlands
1 from Belgium
1 from Slovakia
68 from doubtful or unprovenanced origins (up from 60)

OK, just one fake, just for fun: :whistle:
Quote:A few more plumbatae have come to my attention . . .
[attachment=12481]153mm.jpg[/attachment]

I like this one!
Quote:I like this one!

A few more pictures for you then Smile

[attachment=12484]153mm_4.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12485]153mm_2.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12486]153mm_3.jpg[/attachment]
Thank you Robert in keeping us informed on Plumbata finds I must admit I do like the twisted barb I made this type many years ago, I still wonder why they twisted the shank?
Chears Robert :grin:
Regards Brennivs :lol:
Quote: I still wonder why they twisted the shank?
Tony, that's a question that remains unaswered as yet. I've asked a number of blacksmiths (including you) and the best I got so far is that twisted metal shafts might be more heat-resistant, implying that such twisted plumbatae were used as incendiary devices.
Quote:
brennivs - tony drake post=368431 Wrote:I still wonder why they twisted the shank?
Tony, that's a question that remains unaswered as yet. I've asked a number of blacksmiths (including you) and the best I got so far is that twisted metal shafts might be more heat-resistant, implying that such twisted plumbatae were used as incendiary devices.

Could it be something to do with making the dart fly longer, straighter and true? The same as rifling of a gun barrel makes bullets flying further and straighter than smoothbore barrels?
Quote:Could it be something to do with making the dart fly longer, straighter and true? The same as rifling of a gun barrel makes bullets flying further and straighter than smoothbore barrels?

If so why aren't other throwing weapons made that way? Also I doubt that the rest of the dart would not distort the effect..
And you don't "shoot" a dart like that either, because you don't want it to fly straight, so putting a twisted shaft on it won't improve it at all.

In fact a shaft like that would reduce the aerodynamic qualities of the dart if you wanted it to be shot like a bullet.
Maybe it was done just to look cool. Roman's had a nack for doing that kind of stuff
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