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Full Version: Fresco of a Roman soldier in a red tunic
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Avete omnes,<br>
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I found this photo of a roman fresco in a book about living in ancient Rome. Unfortunately there was no description from what location the fresco was photographed nor a reference about its dating.<br>
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<img src="http://people.freenet.de/u-bahr/praet.bmp" style="border:0;"/><br>
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My scanner doesn't give back the photo in absolute excellent condition, but I can tell You that the soldier wears a red tunic and a cuirass that is represented in white (so iron or silver, if there is not intended a linen cuirass). The officer's sash is in red too with golden stripes and decorations as well as the shoulder pieces. The pteryges are set in a light brown. The cape is dark red - You can see it best under the chin.<br>
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Furthermore he wears a golden helmet of - as I would say - Montefortino type, crested with a red horse hair tail. On the legs there are some lines that give the impression of - bronze - greaves. At last there are yet visible a round or oval shield (he seems to hold it like a greek hoplon), a hasta and the white hilt of a gladius on his left side.<br>
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Anybody knows more about the illustration?<br>
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Uwe<br>
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Sounds like the wall painting from the House of Valerius Rufus in Pompeii, so pre-AD 79.<br>
If he's reading this, perhaps Graham Sumner can confirm if this is his item no. 9 in "Roman Military Clothing (1)" (described but not illustrated, p.21). <p></p><i></i>
Hey, he's fascinating, hadn't seen that one before! Definitely either an officer, or Mars, or an officer/aristocrat portrayed as Mars. Not a common legionary. Thanks for posting that!<br>
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Vale,<br>
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Matthew/Quintus, Legio XX <p></p><i></i>
Quote:</em></strong><hr>Definitely either an officer, or Mars<hr><br>
Until Graham Sumner pitches in, here's a quote from his book:<br>
"Although the figure is probably meant to represent a deity or a hero he appears to be depicted in contemporary panoply, which in fact looks very similar to the figure regarded as Mars on the Altar of Domitius Ahenobarbus." <p></p><i></i>
Avete omnes,<br>
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anybody has an idea, what the gesture with the right hand and the cloak means?<br>
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Greets Uwe <p></p><i></i>
Quote:</em></strong><hr>anybody has an idea, what the gesture with the right hand and the cloak means?<hr><br>
Could it be that this figure was 'painted over'? Usually in Roman art, the right hand is holding a spear in this manner.<br>
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Valete,<br>
Valerius/Robert<br>
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Hi all, Graham Sumner has asked me to post this:<br>
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Yes I can confirm that the detail of the fresco is the one from the House of Valerius Rufus, Pompeii, described on page 21 of my book 'Roman Military Clothing 1'.<br>
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The illustration is taken from the Time Life book 'What life was like when Rome ruled the World'.<br>
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Graham <p></p><i></i>
This is the one I mentioned about three weeks ago on another thread, along with the other fresco of the three men with girded up red tunics playing dice with a guy with a white ungirded tunic. Both from the same Time-Life book. Curiously, Graham never mentioned this fresco.<br>
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Dan <p></p><i></i>
Yes he did!<br>
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See Aitior's post above. <p>Greetings<br>
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Rob Wolters</p><i></i>
Rob, I meant the one of the three red tunic men in the tavern.<br>
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Dan <p></p><i></i>
Sorry, misread your reply.<br>
I don't have the book, so I'd like to see a picture of this fresco... <p>Greetings<br>
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Rob Wolters</p><i></i>