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Full Version: Roman Equivalent of "Sir, Yes, Sir!"
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What would Roman legionaries reply when their officers ordered them to do something? I remember reading Romans did not have an equivalent of "sir" so what would they say? Master? etc. etc.

Any proof?
Depending upon the time period, either:

Vero domine

or

Vero domne

It is my understanding that domine got shortened to domne in the later period of the empire. The above are masculine. A slave replying to a female head of the house would might reply:

Vero domina
what about "Ita Sirra"
Salvete,

what about this little vignette from El Viejo Dragon "Domine! Sí domine!"
Could that be a prostate exam? :lol: :oops:
:lol: :lol:
We've (Leg. III Cyr) have been using "Ita Dominus", something I had sort of flung together, an attempt at "yes sir". Sometimes [I] have just used "Dominus", to acknowledge the command and get going and quick.

I think there is another post about this subject deep in the archives, and I recall it was 'dominus' that appears to exist.

I'd be cautious, we could be doing what has happened before when trying to compare military rank with Roman rankings and titles, to [American or British] modern ranks; Romans just have a different structure, like the whole deal with Centurion - you can't just say it's "the same as a Sargeant/Captain/Major/Whatever", since it's just a big can of worms trying to compare the responsibilities to the modern rank.

It could just as well be soldiers did not even say anything, they could just as well shot off and did what they were told without a peep. Of course I have nothing to really back that up to - the only thing I think of is when I've done [ACW] drill, when a command is given, soldiers don't say anything, they just do it.

And lately I've contemplated finding another term, maybe something like "acknowledged", or "confirmed"....Or maybe "[I] Will do this" or just "will do", but I have no idea how that translates to Latin.
I would say "ita Domine" (you would use the vocative for Lord, rhymes with 'hey').

I can dig out the references to that, er Genesis Ch42, 2 Ezra 4 I believe.

cheers Smile
How about "Oboedio!" (I obey). Must be accompanied by compliance with whatever order.
The Romans wouldn't of used the nominative case in this way. The vocative case needs to be used. So I could see the use of either

Ita domine

or

Vero domine
I agree: I use the Vulgate for guidance, as it was written by a Latin speaker for other Latin speakers to read out so as to be intelligible to other Latin speakers, within a decade of our usual dateline.

eg Gen 42:10 But they said: It is not so, my lord; but thy servants are come to buy food.
qui dixerunt non est ita domine sed servi tui venerunt ut emerent cibos
(Canannites to Joseph as 'princeps Aegypti')

2 Esdras/4 Ezra 4:3 Then I said, "Yes, my lord." And he replied to me:
et dixi: ita, domine meus, et respondit mihi et dixit:
(to an angel)

There are quite a few 'etiam domine': "indeed, Lord", but I'm not sure that is right - more a response to a question, I think, as Latin doesn't really have a comparable 'yes' for all occasions.
But domine wasn't reserved to the pater familia (since he owned the family) and gods? I doubt that free citizens (even soldiers) would use that to a superior.
Quote:But domine wasn't reserved to the pater familia (since he owned the family) and gods? I doubt that free citizens (even soldiers) would use that to a superior.
I think the Vindolanda tablets say otherwise, following a pretty formulaic opening in many cases:
Quote:Applications for leave...
Although most of the texts are mere fragments, we have no reason to doubt that, apart from 175 in which the order of words is quite different, all the texts follow the same formula: rogo domine (name) dignum me habeas cui des commeatum; the only variations are the omission of the name of the recipient in 176 and the addition of te after rogo in 173.
http://vindolanda.csad.ox.ac.uk/tablets ... army.shtml
Quote:How about "Oboedio!" (I obey). Must be accompanied by compliance with whatever order.

I can't say that. I've just tried!
Ha ha!

Try harder!
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