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Full Version: Citing Sources Question
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Folks,
I have a technical question.

Can/How do you cite a illustration on a website? I have a copy of Turabien and it lists how to cite pictures and illustrations for a thesis paper,essay or book, but would the same rule apply for a informational non-profit website?

In other words, if I wanted to post a picture drawn by Ian Heath from Barkers 1984 edition of Armies and Enemies of Imperial Rome to illustrate an examples of various 1st Century Auxilia could/how would I do so?

Do copywrite laws prohibit posting with out the express written consent?

thanks,
V/r
Mike
Quote:Can/How do you cite a illustration on a website?
I think it is best to offer the URL and the date on which you have seen it.

There are several back-ups of the www to allow people to check it, e.g., WebArchive's WayBack Machine. You may consider supplying a full wayback link, like

[url:4vrlprpz]http://web.archive.org/web/20010719060051/www.livius.org/caa-can/caesar/caesar11.html[/url]
(for a web page as it looked in 2001), but of course one can not know a photo's future URL.

Alternatively, you can make a screen dump (i.e., a photo of what is visible on the screen) with a program like PrintKey.
What about a scanned image from a book that is then posted to a website?

v/r
Mike
I'd refer to the book, like normal.
Quote:In other words, if I wanted to post a picture drawn by Ian Heath from Barkers 1984 edition of Armies and Enemies of Imperial Rome to illustrate an examples of various 1st Century Auxilia could/how would I do so?
Unless the image is in the public domain, you'd need to get permission from the image owner. In this case, Ian Heath. Otherwise you'd be in danger of falling foul of copyright law.

You could always re-draw the image, and credit Heath's drawing as the inspiration for your own. That's how a lot of people get around copyright. (I wouldn't dream of mentioning Karen Dixon and Ian Stephenson, or their book on Roman Cavalry Equipment, in this connection.)

We had this discussion a while back.