RomanArmyTalk

Full Version: Caligae Tracks
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
Interesting find in Israel, listed on Archaeologica.

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/893560.html
Very cool!
What they say in the article is incorrect though. There were also caligae prints found at the camp of Kelemantia in Slovakia. I know because a friend of mine took them home for conservation and I saw them with my own eyes :lol:

I'll see if I can find a picture...
Thanks for posting that information! What an incredible find. It would be cool to see a close-up of the imprint to compare it to hobnail patterns. Perhaps a better photo will appear soon.

Randy Sampson
I don't remember seeing any photos of foot prints on the wall? Are they published? I do remember a footprint on a tegula or other type of tile from Britain.
It's not that special indeed. There's a nice footprint on a tile here in the museum. Quite clear and a big foot too. If I sort of hold my foot next to it, it looks like a size 44/11.
Quote:It's not that special indeed. There's a nice footprint on a tile here in the museum. Quite clear and a big foot too. If I sort of hold my foot next to it, it looks like a size 44/11.
Just about halfway down this page:
http://www.romancoins.info/Legionary-Bricks.html
It is a very cool find, though it should be remembered that most Roman civilian shoes were also hobnailed. I don't know about other cultures of that time, but there was certainly Roman influence.

Matthew
To find such kind of prints in concrete or tegulae are quite common. I agree with Matt Amt: civilians wore too hobnailed shoes.

I remember one curious example, (here, at Tarraco) with the print of the fingers and hobnails, so the calligae probably were very damaged (without the front part) and even in such state, still in service!
I wasn't aware that civilians wore caligae as well. Were they used as a type of construction boot for good footing?
Quote:I wasn't aware that civilians wore caligae as well. Were they used as a type of construction boot for good footing?

While primarily known as a soldier's shoe I would be very surprised if they weren't worn by civilians as well. Actually there is one depiction of a caliga style shoe being worn by a worker on a relief found in Germany (from a time when the military use of the caliga seems to have ended already at that). Also it depends on what exactly you mean with caligae. There were other types of shoes as well, the majority of which was nailed and it is not easy to say which was which just by the nailing pattern. So, some of the imprints cited above may well have come from non-caligae style shoes/from shoes worn by civilians.
On the other hand, the limes tiles were probably baked in military run kilns/factories, like in Nijmegen, increasing the chance that these are soldier' prints.
Thanks for the helpful info!
If I recall correctly, at least one of the people killed at Pompeii whose impression is preserved as a cast appears to have been wearing caligae. Nothing else about him seems to indicate a military character (NB - I( am not talking about the soldier from the beach at Herculanium, just in case anyone thinks I have mixed up my references).

As a second point, would all re-enactors note the even depth of the imprints of the hobnails and the even pattern of wear on the nails of the preserved boots. This indicates a flat footfall where the entire sole of the foot hits the ground similtaneously, rather than our modern heal to toe gait. Try to replicate this when you walk in caligae. Not only will you get closer to a truer Roman impression but you will also be less prone to slipping over on smooth surfaces.

Crispvs
Quote:If I recall correctly, at least one of the people killed at Pompeii whose impression is preserved as a cast appears to have been wearing caligae. Nothing else about him seems to indicate a military character (NB - I( am not talking about the soldier from the beach at Herculanium, just in case anyone thinks I have mixed up my references).

As a second point, would all re-enactors note the even depth of the imprints of the hobnails and the even pattern of wear on the nails of the preserved boots. This indicates a flat footfall where the entire sole of the foot hits the ground similtaneously, rather than our modern heal to toe gait. Try to replicate this when you walk in caligae. Not only will you get closer to a truer Roman impression but you will also be less prone to slipping over on smooth surfaces.

Crispvs

I've often walked and ran across ice using this method. However, not with caligae on.
Pages: 1 2