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Neck scarf
#1
What is considered the correct way of wrapping the neck scarf, around your neck. I guess it was for protecting the neck from the segmented armor and perhaps for warmth?

Thanks
Geoff.
Geoff
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#2
I know of two ways to make and wear a Focale. One is worn like a normal long rectangular scarf, or a square one that is folded in half to look like a triangle and worn backwards cowboy style so the two points are tied together in the front. I personally use the backwards cowboy style.


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Salvatore Caretti, Legio IX Hispana
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#3
Lucius.

I'm having one sent to me, so when I see what type it is I'll use your advice.

Ta, very much, thanks.
Geoff.
Geoff
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#4
But what is the evidence for the cowboy style? Regular scarfs are seen on Trajan's Column (?) worn as doubled up around the neck and the ends pulled through the loop once. French style, you could say.
Kis György Márk (by western standards, György Márk Kis)

Legio Leonum Valentiniani

http://www.legioleonum.hu
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#5
They are even better at protecting your neck from the saw like effect of a lorica hamata! Cool
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#6
Quote:But what is the evidence for the cowboy style? Regular scarfs are seen on Trajan's Column (?) worn as doubled up around the neck and the ends pulled through the loop once. French style, you could say.

I can agree with you that the normal scarf style was more prevalent but not all the depictions show that style specifically. It can be assumed that the cowboy style was in use as well.
Salvatore Caretti, Legio IX Hispana
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#7
I've yet to see evidence instead of assumptions for the cowboy style. Some depictions maybe?
Kis György Márk (by western standards, György Márk Kis)

Legio Leonum Valentiniani

http://www.legioleonum.hu
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#8
I've always done it that way because it's how I was taught in boy scouts.
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#9
It is true that triangular scarves are common amongst Roman re-enactors, but that is not the same thing as there actually being evidence for Roman use of triangular scarves. In fact, what evidence there is for Roman scarves shows long scarves of the shape we have all grown up with. Some people have tried to cite the material apparently circling the necks of soldiers depicted on stelae as scarves, but in all likelihood, what are being represented there are hoods which are being worn down.

I do understand the attraction of triangular scarves to those from a Scouting background - I am a Queen's Scout myself (Eagle Scout for any Americans out there) and still serve as a scout leader. The scout scarf though, despite its efficacy for a number of possible uses, many of which the Romans would have understood, is still not evidence for Roman use of triangular scarves.

Therefore, I would strongly recommend that you stick with what the evidence seems to show and utilise a scarf which is long and reasonably narrow (twelve inches wide max). If the scarf you have ordered turns out only to be suitable for use as a triangular scarf, resist the urge to say: 'I've bought it, so therefore I'm going to use it. Instead, put it down to experience and get yourself a new one which is far longer than it is wide. Always go with the evidence and whenever possible, leave assumptions to one side.
Incidentally, tasselled ends are not a problem, as the Romans seem often to have dealt with the issue of fraying warp threads by tying knots into them, thus creating tassels.

For what it's worth, I find a scarf is most useful for protecting the neck from the chafing it would otherwise get from the leather sword baldric.

Crispvs
Who is called \'\'Paul\'\' by no-one other than his wife, parents and brothers. :!: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_exclaim.gif" alt=":!:" title="Exclamation" />:!:

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.romanarmy.net">www.romanarmy.net
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#10
After further investigation (Google), I was proven wrong. Even hardheads like me must succumb to historical evidence. But at least now my impression is more accurate.
Salvatore Caretti, Legio IX Hispana
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#11
I totally agree with Crispus.
In our group we use a rectangular with a very long side, about 120x30 cm. We wear it as a tie (could be focale is the ancient granfather of the modern tie).
The use is very important to protect the neck from:
1) sun
2) chafing of the helmet leather laces
3) chafing of all other leather laces such as, canteen or sword baldric, the scutum belt while marching, etc.
Luca Bonacina
Provincia Cisalpina - Mediolanum
http://www.cisalpina.net
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#12
Totally agree with you Luca.
No way was this meant to stop the so called "chaffing" of Armour. Its there to protect the neck from Baldric, if worn, and Helmet ties. The type used is down to the individual I think. I personally use the long "modern" type. But I do not want to see or hear of anyone using a Brooch to fasten it. This could result in a major injury if something went wrong. I DONT want a brooch sticking in my neck thank you.
Kevin
Kevin
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#13
I shall do my best going by evidence.

Thank you.
Geoff
Geoff
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#14
I agree. I`ll put the idea of a brooch, in the bin.

Ta, very much, thanks Kevin.
Geoff.
Geoff
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