RomanArmyTalk

Full Version: greek translation help and question about "lamp stand" in roman world
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Hi guys

from Africanus, Cesti (kestoi) 7 1.15 : "which actually is called a "lamp-stand""

see the Greek text in attachment

I wonder first if the translation is correct

[attachment=13148]

and second how tall such a "lamp-stand" would be 1m20? 1m40?

edited to ad anyone so smart to tell me how to use Greek characters in the forumsß
Is the transcription right? Λυχνια means 'lampstand'; λνχνια doesn't seem to mean anything.
(09-06-2016, 02:15 PM)Renatus Wrote: [ -> ]Is the transcription right? Λυχνια means 'lampstand'; λνχνια doesn't seem to mean anything.

here is a scan of the whole fragment probably missed the word, from Greek I have no idea

[attachment=13150]
Ah, that has λυχνια, so that's all right.
Λυχνία means lamp, not lamp stand. That should normally be λυχνοστάτης.
But if it is to denote something tall then lamp stand might be okay, and the ones I have see. Would indeed be about 1,60 m tall.
(09-11-2016, 12:19 AM)Giannis K. Hoplite Wrote: [ -> ]Λυχνία means lamp, not lamp stand. That should normally be λυχνοστάτης.

Your knowledge of Greek is vastly superior to mine. All I can say is that, according to Liddell & Scott, λυχνία means 'lampstand', λύχνοϛ means 'lamp' and λυχνοστάτης does not exist.
Hm, and Liddell & Scott's knowlege of Greek is vastly superior to mine, so they should be trusted over me. But I wonder when λυχνοστάτης starts to be used, and also how it is conveyed that λυχνία is a stand.
Thanks guys
Would give both a positive ranking but maybe a mod can d it for me
the 1.60 figure is very likely, the fragment tells that the dioptra is mounted on such a thing and would be impractical to be much higher than 1.80.

Thanks again
Gelu
(09-11-2016, 10:40 PM)Giannis K. Hoplite Wrote: [ -> ]Hm, and Liddell & Scott's knowlege of Greek is vastly superior to mine, so they should be trusted over me. But I wonder when λυχνοστάτης starts to be used, and also how it is conveyed that λυχνία is a stand.

I have been away for a few days. The following is a link to Matthew 5.15 from the relevant Perseus page of Liddell & Scott, so that may help:

[15] οὐδὲ καίουσιν λύχνον καὶ τιθέασιν αὐτὸν ὑπὸ τὸν μόδιον ἀλλ᾽ ἐπὶ τὴν λυχνίαν, καὶ λάμπει πᾶσιν τοῖς ἐν τῇ οἰκίᾳ.

I don't know the cut-off date of Liddell & Scott but presumably λυχνοστάτης came into use after that.